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9 Types Of Anxiety Disorders And Their Symptoms

9 Types Of Anxiety Disorders And Their Symptoms

9 Types Of Anxiety Disorders And Their Symptoms

The main symptom of anxiety disorders is excessive fear or worry. Anxiety disorders can also make it hard to breathe, sleep, stay still, and concentrate.

Your specific symptoms depend on the type of anxiety disorder you have.

Below are types of anxiety disorders and symptoms:

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)

If constant worries and fears distract you from your day-to-day activities, or you are troubled by a persistent feeling that something bad is going to happen, you may be suffering from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

People with GAD are chronic worrywarts who feel anxious nearly all of the time, though they may not even know why. GAD often manifests in physical symptoms like insomnia, stomach upset, restlessness, and fatigue.

Panic attacks and panic disorder

Panic disorder is characterized by repeated, unexpected panic attacks, as well as fear of experiencing another episode. Agoraphobia, the fear of being somewhere where escape or help would be difficult in the event of a panic attack, may also accompany a panic disorder. If you have agoraphobia, you are likely to avoid public places such as shopping malls, or confined spaces such as an airplane.

Phobias and irrational fears

A phobia is an unrealistic or exaggerated fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that in reality presents little to no danger. Common phobias include fear of animals (such as snakes and spiders), fear of flying, and fear of heights. In the case of a severe phobia, you might go to extreme lengths to avoid the object of your fear. Unfortunately, avoidance only strengthens the phobia.

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is the fear of space where it is difficult to escape or receive help if something goes wrong.

People with this type of phobia tend to avoid specific places or situations. For example, they might avoid crowds or public transport. Some people may become housebound in severe cases.

Social anxiety disorder

If you have a debilitating fear of being viewed negatively by others and humiliated in public, you may have social anxiety disorder also known as social phobia. It can be thought of as extreme shyness and in severe cases, social situations are avoided altogether. Performance anxiety (better known as stage fright) is the most common type of social phobia.

Hoarding disorder

Hoarding disorder is a chronic difficulty discarding possessions, accompanied by a dysfunctional attachment to even worthless items. It can lead to excessive accumulation of possessions and a cluttered living space. You may attribute emotion to inanimate objects, have a strong sentimental attachment to items, or see the use in any object. These beliefs can make discarding items overwhelm you with feelings of anxiety, guilt, or sadness.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by unwanted thoughts or behaviors that seem impossible to stop or control. If you have OCD, you may feel troubled by obsessions, such as a recurring worry that you forgot to turn off the oven or that you might hurt someone. You may also suffer from uncontrollable compulsions, such as washing your hands over and over.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an extreme anxiety disorder that can occur in the aftermath of a traumatic or life-threatening event. PTSD can be thought of as a panic attack that rarely, if ever, lets up. Symptoms of PTSD include flashbacks or nightmares about the incident, hyper vigilance, startling easily, withdrawing from others, and avoiding situations that remind you of the event.

Separation anxiety disorder

While separation anxiety is a normal stage of development, if anxieties intensify or are persistent enough to get in the way of school or other activities, your child may have separation anxiety disorder. They may become agitated at just the thought of being away from parents and complain of sickness to avoid playing with friends or going to school.

Treatment

Anxiety disorders respond very well to therapy and often in a relatively short amount of time.

The specific treatment approach depends on the type of anxiety disorder and its severity.

In general, most anxiety disorders are treated with therapy, medication, or some combination of the two.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy and exposure therapy are types of behavioral therapy, meaning they focus on behavior rather than on underlying psychological conflicts or issues from the past. They can help with issues such as panic attacks, generalized anxiety, and phobias.

Anxiety disorders don’t necessarily get worse with age but the number of people suffering from anxiety changes across the lifespan. It becomes more common with older age and is most common among middle-aged adults.

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Food and Health

Health Benefits Of Mackerel Fish

Eating fish is important for a balanced diet and mackerel fish are some of the most widely available and healthiest fish around.

However, before you add mackerel to your diet, it is important to know where they come from and what health benefits and possible side effects they hold.

Mackerel fish is actually a general term that encompasses more than 30 species of fish, most of which belong to the Scombridae.

In many parts of the world, mackerel fish are known as bangada.

These fish are typically found near coastal areas, where they breed and feed, and their range includes both tropical and temperate regions.

Mackerel fish are usually found in large schools, which makes them an easy target for commercial fishermen.

This makes mackerel one of the most common fish on the menu, particularly in North America.

Ranging from 20 cm to 200 cm, these fish have varying physical characteristics, but they offer similar flavor and a relatively aligned nutrient profile.

Mackerel Fish Nutrition Facts

Mackerel species are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as possible high levels of vitamin B12 (nearly 700% of your daily requirement).

They may contain minerals like selenium, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, and iron.

There can be smaller amounts of vitamin A, potassium, zinc, and sodium in it.

Along with 230 calories per filet – an average of 100 grams – there are also 21 grams of protein, representing roughly 40% of your daily required intake.

Due to this impressive nutrient profile and the different ways to prepare mackerel, it remains one of the most popular and readily consumed fish in the world.

Health Benefits of Mackerel Fish

The health benefits of mackerel fish may include improving hair health, protecting the skin, preventing age-related macular degeneration, strengthening the immune system, lowering cholesterol levels, preventing chronic disease, and boosting bone health, among others.

Skin Care

With ample amounts of omega-3 fatty acids and selenium, mackerel fish can possibly take care of all your skincare needs.

These substances may act as antioxidants within the body and possibly helping reduce oxidative stress and the effects of free radicals, which are the natural byproducts of cellular metabolism.

They can also help reduce the appearance of wrinkles and age spots and relieve certain inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis and eczema.

Hair Care

There are many nutrients that are critical to hair care such as protein, iron, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids, all of which might be found in mackerel fish.

A regular dose of these nutrients in your diet will help improve the luster and look of your hair, while also strengthening the hair strands and reducing the effects of scalp conditions, such as dandruff.

May Boost Immunity

Despite having a low level of vitamin C, mackerel fish are still praised for their effects on the immune system.

Coenzyme Q10 is one of the unique elements in mackerel fish that is closely associated with preventing infections and strengthening the body’s defense against oxidative stress.

Omega-3 fatty acids are also known to possibly reduce inflammation, which can put unnecessary strain on the immune system.

May Lower Cholesterol Levels

With an impressive level of omega-3 fatty acids, mackerel fish might improve cholesterol balance in the body by lowering LDL cholesterol and increasing HDL cholesterol levels.

This might reduce the amount of cholesterol that is oxidized and deposited in the arteries as plaque, so this fish is known to possibly lower your risk of atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke, and coronary heart diseases.

 

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Food and Health

Benefits Of Eating Cocoyam

Colocasia esculenta popularly known as cocoyam is a tropical, perenial crop.

It is a starchy tuber crop with three parts namely; corn, stem and leaves, which is grown basically for edible root.

It is the thick, tuber stalk of the Cocoyam plant is an extremely important part of global cuisines and diets, as it has been for thousands of years.

It can also be grown as an ornamental plant for the beautification of the environment as well as a medicinal plant.

Cocoyam has its origin from Asia or Southeast Asia as some researchers have found out and it is a known staple crop in most developing countries of Africa.

It can also be found in India, USA, Japan as well as Singapore.

The health benefits of eating cocoyam  includes providing strength for good aerobic exercise, improving heart and bone health, improving enzyme function and fighting anemia.

Cocoyam contains a wealth of organic compounds, minerals, and vitamins that can benefit our overall health in a number of ways.

One cup (132 grams) of cooked cocoyam has 187 calories — mostly from carbs — and fewer than one gram each of protein and fat.

It has a very significant amount of dietary fiber and carbohydrates, as well as high levels of vitamin A, C, E, vitamin B6, and folate, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database.

There is magnesium, iron, zinc, phosphorous, potassium, manganese, and copper in it.

The plant also provides some protein in your diet, but the amount is almost negligible.

Health Benefits Of Eating Cocoyam

Keeps Hunger At Bay

The Cocoyam is rather calorie-sparse at 142 calories per 100g – around 13% of the possible calorie content.

The low-calorie and high “bulk” of tubers such as cocoyam has made them a staple in diets across the world as they will reduce hunger and make you feel “full” without too many calories.

For this reason, Cocoyam can be an excellent food addition for those who are dieting, as one of the hardest parts of losing weight is getting past the feelings of hunger.

Helps Control Blood Sugar

Although Cocoyam is a starchy vegetable, it contains two types of carbohydrates that are beneficial for blood sugar management: fiber and resistant starch.

Fiber is a carbohydrate that humans can’t digest. Since it’s not absorbed, it has no impact on blood sugar levels.

It also helps slow down the digestion and absorption of other carbs, preventing large blood sugar spikes after meals.

Cancer Prevention 

The health benefits of eating cocoyam plays an important part in the antioxidant activity in our bodies.

High level of vitamin A, vitamin C, and various other phenolic antioxidants found in Cocoyam help to boost immune system and help eliminate dangerous free radicals from our system.

By eliminating these free radicals, our general health is almost guaranteed.

Cryptoxanthin, which is found in Cocoyam, is directly related to a lowered chance of developing both lung and oral cancers.

Reduces Muscle Cramps 

Consuming high-potassium foods is directly related to decreased muscle cramping and improved muscle strength.

Muscle cramps are one of the common side effects of low potassium levels.

This happens when an athlete becomes dehydrated and don’t consume enough potassium-rich foods before and after exercise.

Boosts Immune System

Cocoyam plays an important role in the immune system.

Vitamin C is found in Cocoyams, which helps to encourage immune system to create more white blood cells, which help to defend the body from foreign pathogens and agents.

Additionally, vitamin C acts as an antioxidant, which moderately prevents the development of conditions such as heart disease and cancer.

Generally, the health benefits of eating cocoyam includes improving the chances of dietary success, supporting digestive health, a good source of carbohydrate, improving metabolic efficiency and nutrient absorption, strengthening immune function and supporting blood health.

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Food and Health

Healthy Benefits Of Tiger Nuts For Women

Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus) is not actually a nut.

They are classified as tubers that start growth under the dirt and are classed under the sedge family, also known as tiger nutsedge, yellow nutsedge, or earth almond.

Scientists have come to understand that tiger nuts were a source of nutrition for the earliest humans and before.

This article looks at six healthy benefits of tiger nuts for women.

It is rich in high insoluble fiber

The US National Library of Medicine has documented that 100g of tiger nut flour contains around 59.71g of dietary fibre.

The most significant finding was that it’s high in insoluble fibre which makes our fiber friendly friends list that also includes foods such as carrots, cabbage, chia seeds, oats and apples.

This insoluble fiber helps to bulk up stool so it’s easier to pass and can be very helpful with constipation.

A diet high in fibre during pregnancy has been observed to reduce preeclampsia and cardiovascular risks.

The University of California San Francisco recommends that pregnant women eat between 20-35 grams per day.

Ideal for anyone with lactose intolerance

For those who are lactose intolerant and unable to consume cow’s milk, this is an ideal substitute and a healthy option.

If you compare all non-dairy milk alternatives, this one has the highest nutritional, healthy fat and fiber content.

It’s also a good source of calcium, and can be one nutritious food to help achieve the 1,000 to 1,300 mg dairy recommended calcium intake.

Cardiovascular disease protection

According to the National Health Institute, vitamin E is an antioxidant-rich fat-soluble compound important for repairing free radical damage, a healthy immune system and important in blood vessel and heart health.

Food is preferred to supplements when it comes to vitamin E, and tiger nuts have vitamin E in abundance in both milk and flour form.

It also boosts good cholesterol

The word cholesterol makes most of us panic, but we all need cholesterol to survive and the right types of cholesterol are important for our health.

For example, oleic acid a type of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) found in tiger nuts (the same one that’s also in avocados and olive oil) assists in increasing the “happy” HDL cholesterol, essential for mother and baby during the nine months.

Excellent source of magnesium

Magnesium can carry out over 300 vital biochemical tasks in the body according to the Office of Dietary Supplements.

A 100 grams of tiger nuts provide up to 17 percent magnesium , helping promote the standard function of nerves, maintain blood pressure levels, control sugars and strengthen bones.

Aids digestion and health gut

As we have learned the health benefits of tiger nuts are many, making them a fantastic food for anyone.

In Asia and Africa where tiger nuts are most prevalent, they have been used to treat ailments for the stomach, irritable bowel syndrome, and cover a wide range of digestive complaints.

Outside the medical system and in medication passed down through generations, tiger nuts have been known to aid in the treatment of flatulence and diarrhoea.

This could be due to the fact that those little tubers are rich in resistance starch that acts as a prebiotic to help feed our gut flora and maintain a healthy digestive system.

We all understand that during pregnancy digestive problems can occur, so a regular intake of tiger nuts will be of immense benefit.

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